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Cure Your Child With Food

Cure Your Child With Food

Guest Post Written by Martha Berkesch from Mother Nature Nutrition.

If your children are picky eaters and you think they may not be getting all the nutrients they need, you’ve got to check out Cure Your Child With Food by Kelly Dorfman. This book is also a must-read if your kids aren’t growing or have stomachaches, constipation or diarrhea, chicken skin, sleep problems and many other health conditions.

Kelly Dorfman, who also writes for the Huffington Post and the magazine Living Without, presents solutions to many children’s problems in an easy-to-read, entertaining book. She explains how to become a nutrition detective when it comes to analyzing your child and realizes that parents know best about their own children. She shows how nutrition can help with chronic ear infections, eczema, picky eating, attention problems, speech delays and mood, to name a few.

Her first step as nutrition detective is determining whether the clues point to an irritant or a deficiency. Many symptoms such as skin rashes, poor sleep, mouth sores and constipation, indicate a food sensitivity. Other symptoms like failure to thrive, picky eating and “chicken skin” are signs of a nutrient deficiency that can usually be fixed with supplements. For example, lack of appetite can mean that your child is deficient in zinc.

Dorfman lists the signs of dairy and gluten intolerances and explains the differences between sensitivities and allergies. She advises on how to choose a kids multivitamin and fish oil. She gives many real-life examples of the children she has helped over the years to show how they have been helped by nutrition.

I’m sure there are some parents of picky eaters reading this right now, wondering how they can get their children to eat new foods. In Cure Your Child With Food, Dorfman has an E.A.T. protocol showing how to introduce new foods to picky eaters. The steps of E.A.T. include eliminating irritants, adding one food at a time and having your child take a bite of the new food every day for 2 weeks.

My only criticism of Cure Your Child With Food is that Dorfman doesn’t acknowledge the fact that some food sensitivities can be overcome with a gut healing protocol. She implies that if your child is dairy intolerant, she will be intolerant forever. She also doesn’t mention raw dairy and the fact that some children who can’t tolerate pasteurized dairy may be just fine with raw dairy.

All-in-all, I found Cure Your Child With Food to be an excellent, well-written and informative book. With the stories of Molly, Shane, Liam and many others, she illustrates how she has helped many children by changing their diets and eliminating problematic foods. Many parents have come to Dorfman as a last resort, and she has been able to turn angry, violent, sensitive and even bipolar children into the happy, well-adjusted children they were meant to be.

If your child has any issues, don’t delay reading this book or seeing me or another qualified nutritionist to address his problem. Some conditions are hard to reverse the longer they continue. It’s important that your child has the nutrients he needs to grow and develop into a happy, healthy and intelligent adult.